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  • Disclosure
    Nobody pays me to write any of the copy on my blog, and should I ever have the good fortune that they do, I will declare it. My main employment is as the owner and principal of The Future Place consultancy. The Future Place provides two key services 1) training and services to industry and academic bodies and 2) consultancy services to companies. The details of the companies I work with are a private matter, but if I blog about any company who has paid The Future Place more than expenses recently (approx. two years) I will mention that they are a client. I hold equity in Virtual Surveys and provide consulting services to them from time to time. I am paid to run courses for a number of trade bodies and over the last few years clients have included ESOMAR, AMSRS, MRS, and MRIA.

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Hi Ray

I read an article in Metro last week on my commute to work about these codes, and I got to thinking the same thing as you - QR codes have a lot of applications for market research.
In addition to the above I have a couple more to add. I do a lot of automotive research and my first thought was to leave a sign with the codes on at dealership exits to pick up dealer feedback (similar to Claire's idea above).
Also, when conducting surveys with paper questionnaires or sending out invitation letters, a QR code could be used to linked to the on line version of the survey instead.
Another way they could be used is at the back end of surveys if you have an on line reporting portal for a publishing results, you could have the code printed on business or plastic cards so clients can access up to date results wherever they are.
And of course thinking of business cards, you can have a QR code printed on them to link directly to your company website.

It will be interesting to see where they pop up in MR in future!

Liz Hardman
Northstar Research Partners (UK)

Genroe

Ray,

I think that one great use for QR-Codes is as a way to embed URLs for customer feedback surveys on the actual product.

Instead of printing a long (or even short) URL that a customer has to enter into their PC or device just print a QR code on the product itself. That way the customer just has to scan the QR code on the product and they get automatically directed to the product feedback site. The variations in codes means that you can embed simple product line information in the URL as well, eliminating the need for the customer to enter this data themselves.

Adam Ramshaw
http://genroe1to1.genroe.com/

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